Dealing with Canadian Doctors

resilient1

Well-known member
Trusted Member
This is incorrect.
Just because one independent physician thinks a particular treatment plan is acceptable, does not mean any other physician is obligated to agree or continue it. That's why you should continue to follow-up with the MD that was prescribing the TRT/HRT in the first place. And if you moved, or they moved, there is again no obligation for a completely different and independent provider to continue that plan.

I agree that it is best to maintain the relationship with the prescribing physician, and I also agree that another physician is not obligated to continue or support treatment, but in this instance the physician in question has been supporting the patient's needs by providing symptom management. And, according to the OP she has been doing so for quite some time. If she did not believe the treatment was necessary she should not have agreed to continue it, but she has. To cease treatment at this point would require some legitimate justification, which was my original point. Since beginning treatment has the patient's condition changed? Why is the treatment no longer required?

I suppose the one criteria she could use to make an argument is that she is a general practitioner, and therefore is not qualified/comfortable continuing to prescribe the medication. But, she should have referred him to an endo at the start. From an ethical standpoint, I don't see how she can defend a decision to deny treatment at this point, however, I could be missing something.

I recommended monitoring all conversations, as her sentiments seem petty, and non-medically based, which gives the patient a case to file a grievance. I would request a referral to an endo, asap. If that fails, try and find another gp. It all sounds incredibly unprofessional, and a whole lot of unnecessary grief.
 
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Sorbate

Trusted Member
Trusted Member
I agree that it is best to maintain the relationship with the prescribing physician, and I also agree that another physician is not obligated to continue or support treatment, but in this instance the physician in question has been supporting the patient's needs by providing symptom management. And, according to the OP she has been doing so for quite some time. If she did not believe the treatment was necessary she should not have agreed to continue it, but she has. To cease treatment at this point would require some legitimate justification, which was my original point. Since beginning treatment has the patient's condition changed? Why is the treatment no longer required?

I suppose the one criteria she could use to make an argument is that she is a general practitioner, and therefore is not qualified/comfortable continuing to prescribe the medication. But, she should have referred him to an endo at the start. From an ethical standpoint, I don't see how she can defend a decision to deny treatment at this point, however, I could be missing something.

I recommended monitoring all conversations, as her sentiments seem petty, and non-medically based, which gives the patient a case to file a grievance. I would request a referral to an endo, asap. If that fails, try and find another gp. It all sounds incredibly unprofessional, and a whole lot of unnecessary grief.
Lol, you know you are arguing with a doctor?
 

resilient1

Well-known member
Trusted Member
Lol, you know you are arguing with a doctor?
I figured the individual may be, but his reply doesn't, or at least doesn't appear to take into account that my reply to the original post is in regards to a physician who has been providing treatment for some time, not whether a new doctor is bound to continue or accept another's diagnosis or treatment, which was his comment. I can see how my previous post may have been interpreted as such, but that's not the content on which it was based.

I'm attempting to clarify a point, so that I can learn. Not everything is an argument.
 
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resilient1

Well-known member
Trusted Member
Well my concern about being open is that it would go on my medical record permanently.
You can ask about access to blood work without disclosing what you are doing, or you could just ask your doctor's opinion on the use of steroids, and depending how they reply then decide to request blood work. If they give you the 3rd degree you drop it, but you won't know unless you try.
 
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